Seminars

Monitoring of Volcanic Eruptions, Pyrocumulonimbus (PyroCb), and Ensuing Impacts on the UTLS Worldwide

October 27, 2022
 Online
 AOS Application Seminar
The stratospheric volcanic eruption creates both local hazards and climate-perturbation potential. The young volcanic cloud (VC) is inherently extreme and peculiar in its form and composition, which hampers accurate characterization; most individual satellite remote sensing (SRS) instruments are not designed for such extreme atmospheric conditions. The aged VC may be so tenuous as to be nearly undetectable by certain SRS techniques. A basic understanding of the evolving VC lies in combining observations from different sensors that together can fully capture the physical features- height and concentration of ash, sulfur, or ice. NRL's research thrust is to optimally combine measurements of volcanic events to better understand how the VC adversely affects individual SRS and impacts the earth/atmosphere system. Pyrocumulonimbus (pyroCb) are fire-induced and smoke-infused thunderstorms that serve as the primary pathway for smoke to reach the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). The magnitude of smoke plumes observed in the UTLS has increased significantly in recent years, rivaling or exceeding the impact from all volcanic eruptions observed over the last decade, with the potential for significant climate feedbacks on seasonal and hemispheric scales. We summarize what the community has learned from these extreme events and identify science questions that remain unanswered. Emphasis is placed on NASA satellite observations that serve a critical role in this rapidly growing and interdisciplinary research community.
Meeting Summary

Understanding Data Needs in the Aviation Community

May 26, 2022
 Online
 AOS Application Seminar
The Atmosphere Observing System (AOS) will help provide transformative three-dimensional space-based and suborbital observations of essential collocated cloud, dynamic, precipitation and aerosol processes, leading to improved predictions of weather and smoke that will directly support and enhance aviation applications. In this seminar invited panelists, Danny Sims (FAA AWRP), Nathan Polderman (United Airlines), and Ty Higginbotham (AWC), discussed their current uses of remote sensing products for monitoring and modeling hazardous weather, with a particular focus on data product use for turbulence, icing and low-level cloud hazards.
Meeting Summary

UNICEF Data Needs and Barriers for Air Quality and Public Health

March 31, 2022
 Online
 AOS Application Seminar
UNICEF data needs and barriers in the area of public health and air quality. This talk, presented by Amy Wickman (UNICEF), provided an overview of UNICEF's work in the climate, energy, environment and disaster risk reduction sectors, including action to address air pollution. This was then followed by a discussion of how measurements from the upcoming AOS mission such as weather and air quality forecasting and modeling can benefit UNICEF, its partners and communities where UNICEF works.
Meeting Summary

AOS and Benefits of Lidar for Applications

February 24, 2022
 Online
 AOS Seminar
The Atmosphere Observing System (AOS) will help provide transformative three-dimensional space-based and suborbital observations of essential collocated cloud, dynamic, precipitation and aerosol processes, leading to improved predictions of weather, air quality and climate for the benefit of society. AOS Lidar observations will, for the first time, capture diurnally variability in the vertical profile of aerosols as well as provide unprecedented accuracy in aerosol speciation. In this seminar, invited panelists will discuss their current uses of lidar for applications and the benefits of these instruments for societal decision-making activities.

Could Wildfires Amplify Drought and Heatwave?

January 20, 2022
 Online
 AOS Application Seminar
The influence of drought and heatwaves on wildfires has been clearly shown in literature, but whether wildfires, especially their resultant aerosols, can amplify drought and heatwave is still largely unknown. This question has become increasingly important as wildfires have increased rapidly over many parts of the world, such as over western United States, in recent decades. In this presentation, I will give evidence of the non-linear influences of aerosols on clouds, precipitation and diabatic heating of the atmosphere as shown by joint use of MODIS, CloudSat, Aura/MLS, CALIPSO, and TRMM/GPM datasets to suggest that aerosols can induce a positive feedback between wildfire, drought and extreme surface temperatures both at cloud and regional scales. The limitations and challenges of these results and needed improvements of observations were discussed in this series.

The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center and a Paradigm for Engaging Stakeholders

November 17, 2021
 Online
 AOS Application Seminar
Speakers Emily Berndt (MSFC/SPoRT), Aaron Naeger (UAH/SPoRT), Anita LeRoy (UAH/SPoRT), and Aaron Jacobs (NOAA NWS), discussed NASA's SPoRT research and application activities as well as application opportunities relevant to the future AOS mission.

The Aerosol Cloud meTeorology Interactions oVer the western ATlantic Experiment (ACTIVATE)

September 23, 2021
 Online
 AOS Application Seminar
Invited speaker, Armin Sorooshian (U. of Arizona), spoke about NASA's ACTIVATE program and AOS applications in this series.
Meeting Summary